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Entries Tagged as 'France'

Learning French: Don’t Try It This Way

September 19th, 2019 · No Comments · France

“Je suis Americain!” That was all the French the Red Buttons character knew, in the sprawling D-Day classic movie “The Longest Day” — and he repeated it to himself like a mantra as he and his fellow paratroopers were flown to Normandy on June 6, 1944. “Je suis Americain.” (I am American.) So the French […]

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Note to Self: Dry Southern France Can Burn, Too

September 6th, 2019 · No Comments · France

It was about 1.30 p.m. when the fire equipment began arriving. As I try to reconstruct it, it began with a siren that we attributed to a health emergency in our little town among the hills. But it was not a lone rescue vehicle. Another came behind it, heralded by the sing-song European sirens. Then […]

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France and Its Summer Vacations

August 19th, 2019 · No Comments · France, Languedoc, tourism, Travel

If you are reading this in the U.S., brace yourself. In France, all employees get five weeks of paid vacation per year. Five weeks. More than a month. And that does not include one-day public holidays, which can reach double digits in a given year. We know about France and its summer vacations because we […]

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What’s in a Name? A Lot, When it is Oberjuerge in France

August 9th, 2019 · No Comments · France

It is a hard name to pronounce. No question. Oberjuerge. Go ahead, take a whack at it. What is your best guess? It has been anglicized, a bit, if that helps your guesswork. Here in the south of France, where we are based, locals officials and merchants will attempt to pronounce the name rather than […]

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Cycle Fans: Sports’ Biggest Optimists

July 28th, 2019 · No Comments · France

I love cycling fans. They won’t quit on their sport no matter how dangerous, complicated, seedy or drug-drenched it gets. They are there for it, all the time. Living in France, a person can hardly escape cycling — in particular during the Tour de France, which rode into Paris to wrap up proceedings today in […]

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75 Years Later, France to Allies: ‘Merci’

June 6th, 2019 · No Comments · France, Germany, Paris

Seventy-five years ago today, 150,000 American, British and Canadian troops landed in France to begin the reclamation of Europe and especially France from Nazi Germany. Recalling D-Day, as June 6, 1944 is known in the U.S., has been a very big thing this week, here in France, and I am more than a little surprised. […]

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Circuses Still Make the Rounds in France

May 7th, 2019 · No Comments · France, Languedoc

In the United States, a traveling circus is a historical curiosity. The age of the portable “big tops”, which came into U.S. cities and towns, usually by train, often announcing their presence by parading down Main Street … that age is so last millennium. It was two years ago that the Ringling Bros. and Barnum […]

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Notre Dame in Flames

April 16th, 2019 · No Comments · France, Paris

Because of a little park named after Pope John XXIII, I came to think of Notre Dame from the “wrong” end of Paris’s famed cathedral. In a silly, selfish way, I thought of Notre Dame as “belonging to me” more than the average tourist way because I was on its grounds for jogging/walking nearly every […]

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Good News! A Hefty, First-Tier Newspaper!

April 14th, 2019 · 1 Comment · Egypt, France, Journalism, London, Newspapers, soccer, Sports Journalism, Travel

Readers of a certain age — say, 30 years or more — will remember when major newspapers were big, colorful, information-packed marvels of news gathering. Before the Age of Great Newspapers ended, around the turn of the century, it had been observed by many subscribers that Sunday editions, in particular, with all their special sections […]

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Spending a Fun Friday Night with the Local Soccer Club

March 17th, 2019 · No Comments · Football, France, Languedoc, Paris, soccer

Living in western Europe, the assumption by most Americans, including this one, is that professional soccer teams must not be far from any point on the maps of England, Spain, Germany, Italy and France. That assumption would be wrong. Where we live, in the Occitanie region (previously known as the Languedoc) of southern France, plenty […]

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